Former Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer to Join Bipartisan Policy Center's National Transportation Policy Project BPC

Former Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer to Join Bipartisan Policy Center's National Transportation Policy Project BPC Praises Former Governor Mark Warner for Project Service

8/22/2008
The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) is pleased to announce the selection of former Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer as Co-Chair of its National Transportation Policy Project (NTPP). Archer currently serves as Chairman of the Michigan law firm Dickinson Wright PLLC. The BPC also announces today that Founding NTPP Co-Chair and former Virginia Governor Mark Warner is stepping down from the Project as he campaigns for the U.S. Senate. As Detroit's Mayor from 1994 to 2001, Archer worked in the heart of America's auto industry. He also is a strong advocate for public transportation, believing that improving transit is an environmental, traffic and land-use issue - a key component to making any region a better place to live. From 2003-2004, Archer was the first African American to be elected President of the American Bar Association. He previously served as President of the National League of Cities, Chair of the Detroit Regional Chamber and Associate Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court. "I'm excited about the opportunity to serve on the BPC's National Transportation Policy Project," said Archer. "Bipartisan cooperation is critical to achieving meaningful reform of transportation policy. I look forward to sharing my experiences with elected officials who are concerned about transportation and dedicating my time to this important project." Archer earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from Western Michigan University. He went on to earn his Juris Doctor from Detroit College of Law in 1970. He is married to Judge (ret.) Trudy DunCombe Archer of Michigan's 36th District Court. The couple has two sons. Archer joins NTTP Co-Chairs former Senator Slade Gorton and Congressmen Sherwood Boehlert and Martin Sabo in leading the BPC project. NTPP is charged with creating a new vision of transportation policy, one that focuses on national economic, environmental and security goals. "Dennis is a highly respected and highly skilled public servant who brings a wealth of expertise to our project," said Sabo. "His work in Detroit and with the National League of Cities will be a great asset." "We look forward to having Dennis join us in our efforts to reform U.S. transportation policy in this country," said Gorton. "He will offer us a critical local and state perspective." The BPC sincerely thanks NTTP Founder and Co-Chair Governor Mark Warner for his leadership as he steps down from the Project to pursue a bid for the U.S. Senate. Warner was instrumental in launching the NTTP earlier this year and has helped to shape the Project's direction. "We are very grateful for Mark's service," said Boehlert. "He brought invaluable experience and insight to our work having been the governor of Virginia where transportation issues were one of his top priorities." "Solutions to our transportation challenges and infrastructure needs will require a responsible, bipartisan approach, and I am pleased that I have had an opportunity to work with the BPC on this project over the past year," said Warner. "BPC's emphasis on bipartisan problem-solving is a great model for how we must work together if we want to begin solving many of our nation's biggest challenges. Dennis Archer brings solid experience to the table and I know that, as he has done great things for Detroit, he will do great things for the BPC." For more information about the BPC's National Transportation Policy Project, visit www.bipartisanpolicy.org. About the Bipartisan Policy Center: Former U.S. Senate Majority Leaders Baker, Daschle, Dole, and Mitchell formed the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) to develop and promote solutions that can attract the public support and political momentum to achieve real progress. The BPC acts as an incubator for policy efforts that engage top political figures, advocates, academics, and business leaders in the art of principled compromise.
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